Browsing: Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=F5KuP6qEuew Although graphics in 3D computer games has gone really far in the last decade or so, the water in most of them does not look very real — especially when you throw a couple of solid objects into it. Now, a new fluid simulation algorithm, called “Position Based Fluids” (PBD) makes it look easy, with water bouncing off objects in a startlingly realistic fashion. “In fluid simulation, enforcing incompressibility is crucial for realism; it is also computationally expensive. (…) By formulating and solving a set of positional constraints that enforce constant density, our method allows similar incompressibility and convergence…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=CnPgJQFEdsc Artist Leon Keer has worked on a large number of 3D street paintings in the last couple of years at events around the world. Because these street paintings have to be viewed from an exact vantage point, Keer is looking for ways to create a bigger visual impact for the spectators and add information. On Lost At E Minor, he writes that his solution is augmented reality with new object recognition technologies. This adds a new dimension to the 3D-painting medium, making street art interactive so viewers can use their mobile devices to see virtual objects and additional information overlayed. When they…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=I2l0qklSzks We’re quickly getting used to the fact that computer, smartphone and tablet screens are meant to be touched — but what about paper? Fujitsu has developed a technology that detects objects your finger is touching in the real world, effectively turning any surface — a piece of paper, for example — into a touchscreen, DigInforeports. “This system doesn’t use any special hardware; it consists of just a device like an ordinary webcam, plus a commercial projector. Its capabilities are achieved by image processing technology,” explains Taichi Murase, a researcher at Fujitsu’s Media Service System Lab. In a video presentation (above), we…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=DkpEz7znpnc Cool levitation and heating effects can be done at home — if you happen to have a little specialized electrical equipment and a few tools. This shows a piece of metal floating in a coil and then melting. How does this happen? It isn’t magic, just physics. First the levitation. If you run an alternating current (like the one from the outlets in your house) through coils you generate a magnetic field that changes with time. House current would make it change 60 times per second. (That’s the “60 Hz” you see printed on the power adaptors and…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=scOd9aILwPY Lots of jobs are now handled by robots. Soon we might add Indy pit crew to the list. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has a robot that can change a tire, picking up the tire, getting it off and on the (simulated) wheel and using the lug wrench. This may sound pretty simple, but the point isn’t the changing of the tire — it’s holding the tools. Robots that can hold tools are a lot more versatile than those built for a specific task, because then they can adapt to doing whatever is asked of them —…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=xGEpJGnQeQI Technology lecturer Dylan Menzies doesn’t play the violin in the traditional sense. Instead he uses software and lasers to translate the positioning, speed and motion of a traditional wooden bow into music. His optical sensor-driven O-Bow is encased in copper with a groove for the bow. Wired reportson his solution for replicating the sound of a violin but making something easier to play:A system that uses synthesis software to translate data sent from an optical flow sensor, which tracks the speed, motion and angle of a wooden rod in high resolution as it is moved across it. The data is used…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ol8c9bdp7YI We’ve already learned that drones aren’t just good at spying and shooting missiles in Afghanistan or Yemen. Their civilian counterparts know how to dance the Harlem Shake, play catch, and autonomously avoid obstacles. Now, they also can snatch objects like eagles hunting for prey. The University of Pennsylvania General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception (GRASP) team has developed a quadrotor equipped with a mechanical claw that can grab objects while in flight — just like an eagle would snatch fish out of a lake. The researchers used a small unmanned aerieal vehicle, the AscTec Hummingbird, and mounted an arm that has a two-prong, dual-joint gripping claw that was 3D…

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