Browsing: Chemistry

Using the same baking soda found in most grocery stores, Lawrence Livermore scientists, along with colleagues from Harvard University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have created a significant advance in carbon dioxide capture. The team developed a new type of carbon capture media composed of core-shell microcapsules, which consist of a highly permeable polymer shell and a fluid (made up of sodium carbonate solution) that reacts with and absorbs carbon dioxide (CO2). Sodium carbonate is typically known as the main ingredient in baking soda. The capsules keep the liquid contained inside the core, and allow the CO2 gas…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS1n74UZrKY href=”http://mashable.com/category/Amazon”>Amazon unveiled its first smartphone on Wednesday at an event in Seattle near its headquarters, four years after the company started working on the project. On the surface — and even under the hood — the 4.7-inch Fire phone looks like any other Android phone on the market, but Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and team have baked both big and small touches into the Fire phone to make it stand out in such a crowded market. The Fire phone boasts a 2.2GHz quad-core Snapdragon 800 processor, an Adreno 330 graphics processor, 2GB of RAM and runs on Amazon’s custom version of Android, called Fire OS.  While none of…

If you thought graphene was going to be the next do-everything material, we’ve got news for you: Multi-Use Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) has just taken its place. Developed by scientists at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, this wonder material can do everything you might expect a wonder material to do – and more. So far, TiO2′s uses include producing clean water, producing clean energy, generate hydrogen, kill bacteria, be formed into flexible solar cells, and even extend the useful lifespan of batteries. What’s more is that the materials used to make TiO2 are cheap and readily available, making its possibilities nearly endless. TiO2…

Some people are real sticklers for expiration dates on food, but others are risk-takers, keeping stuff around long past its “best by” date. What if you could see how fresh your food was without even opening the package? A research team from Peking University in Beijing presented just such a solution at a meeting of the American Chemical Society. The method is a tiny gel-like tag that affixes to the exterior of the food packaging and changes color to indicate the level of the food’s freshness. The tag method is based on ambient temperatures and how they affect food spoilage rates.…

Researchers at the University of Maryland have demonstrated through computer modeling that graphene can be triggered by an electric field to fold itself into a nifty three-dimensional box that can serve as a container for hydrogen storage and then unfold itself. The technique could greatly increase a fuel cell’s ability to store and release hydrogen — an advance that could improve the capacity of hydrogen fuel cells for powering cars. The way in which the graphene folds up into a box has been dubbed hydrogenation-assisted graphene origami (HAGO) and involves cutting the graphene into a pattern and then functionalizing it by atomically…

A small British firm is looking forward to a day in which we will take our cars to the garage and fill them with hydrogen. Acal Energy, based in Runcorn in Cheshire, says it has developed a chemistry that could make hydrogen fuel cells much cheaper and longer-lasting than current technologies. It wants to license its chemistry to the world’s car-makers, opening the way for hydrogen vehicles to sell in large volumes in 10 or 20 years’ time. “We believe this is one of the breakthrough technologies,” says Brendan Bilton, the company’s chief commercial officer. “We’re pretty confident and excited……

A decade from now, a recorder powered by plant parts and stashed in the woods may answer the age-old question: If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? That’s one potential application for an energy conversion technology inspired by photosynthesis, the process plants use to convert sunlight into food. Plants convert nearly 100 percent of the photons they capture from sunlight into electrons, which go through a series of reactions on the pathway to generating sugars, the team behind the technology explained. “What we are trying to do…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=dV11TUcdrgY For a true cybernetic limb to work well, the wearer has to be able to feel objects when they touch them. And if robots are going to learn how to grab an egg without crushing it, for instance, they need a more sophisticated way of figuring out how much pressure they’re exerting. Both feats may soon be achieved, thanks to a new artificial skin that senses pressure. The artificial skin, created by a Stanford University team led by chemist Zhenan Bao and physicist Gregor Schwartz, works the same way that real skin does. “We tried to mimic the function…

Consider a wind farm generating electricity at two in the morning. Because most people are asleep, there’s little demand for electricity on the grid, so energy produced could become a surplus with little to no value. Storing this excess energy in some kind of battery is a way to conserve the renewable energy for use during peak times, but methods for doing so are cumbersome and expensive. But now researchers have developed a more affordable and efficient way for energy companies and homeowners to store and reuse wind and solar power. Curtis Berlinguette and Simon Trudel, two chemistry professors from…

After testing the ground, scientists will be sniffing the air to learn more about the nuclear bomb North Korean officials detonated today (Jan. 12). An earthquake, which isn’t likely to occur naturally in North Korea, was the first indication that the secretive nation had conducted an underground bomb test. The U.S. Geological Survey and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) detected a 5.1-magnitude earthquake in the same region where North Korea had conducted previous nuclear tests around 9 a.m. local time today. News agencies in the U.S. and South Korea reported on the unusual activity, with North Korea’s state-run news…